How to really leave no child behind…

How to really leave no child behind…

How to really leave no child behind…

1 Comment on How to really leave no child behind…

Smithsonian Magazine.

“Whatever it takes” is an attitude that drives not just Kirkkojarvi’s 30 teachers, but most of Finland’s 62,000 educators in 3,500 schools from Lapland to Turku-professionals selected from the top 10 percent of the nation’s graduates to earn a required master’s degree in education. Many schools are small enough so that teachers know every student. If one method fails, teachers consult with colleagues to try something else. They seem to relish the challenges. Nearly 30 percent of Finland’s children receive some kind of special help during their first nine years of school. The school where Louhivuori teaches served 240 first through ninth graders last year; and in contrast with Finland’s reputation for ethnic homogeneity, more than half of its 150 elementary-level students are immigrants-from Somalia, Iraq, Russia, Bangladesh, Estonia and Ethiopia, among other nations. “Children from wealthy families with lots of education can be taught by stupid teachers,” Louhivuori said, smiling. “We try to catch the weak students. It’s deep in our thinking.”

When Ros and I were looking at schools to place our daughters in, we did a lot of research and found that there is literally only one school in Calgary (Charging about $14k/child/yr) that would publicly state: “We are responsible for your child’s education. If your child is not learning it is our problem. We ask you to sit your child down to do homework, but please do not assist. If your child can not complete the homework assigned, we want to know.” Apparently, in Finland, it’s a national education policy standard.

There are no mandated standardized tests in Finland, apart from one exam at the end of students’ senior year in high school. There are no rankings, no comparisons or competition between students, schools or regions. Finland’s schools are publicly funded. The people in the government agencies running them, from national officials to local authorities, are educators, not business people, military leaders or career politicians. Every school has the same national goals and draws from the same pool of university-trained educators. The result is that a Finnish child has a good shot at getting the same quality education no matter whether he or she lives in a rural village or a university town. The differences between weakest and strongest students are the smallest in the world, according to the most recent survey by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). “Equality is the most important word in Finnish education. All political parties on the right and left agree on this,” said Olli Luukkainen, president of Finland’s powerful teacher’s union.

But, here we pressure and torture our children by grading them against each other and shaming them when they show up at the bottom of the pile:

In the United States, which has muddled along in the middle for the past decade, government officials have attempted to introduce marketplace competition into public schools. In recent years, a group of Wall Street financiers and philanthropists such as Bill Gates have put money behind private-sector ideas, such as vouchers, data-driven curriculum and charter schools, which have doubled in number in the past decade. President Obama, too, has apparently bet on compe ≠tition. His Race to the Top initiative invites states to compete for federal dollars using tests and other methods to measure teachers, a philosophy that would not fly in Finland. “I think, in fact, teachers would tear off their shirts,” said Timo Heikkinen, a Helsinki principal with 24 years of teaching experience. “If you only measure the statistics, you miss the human aspect.”

And, our failure rates speak for themselves:

Ninety-three percent of Finns graduate from academic or vocational high schools, 17.5 percentage points higher than the United States, and 66 percent go on to higher education, the highest rate in the European Union. Yet Finland spends about 30 percent less per student than the United States.

Not only do they spend less money, but the children also spend even less time cooped up in school pretending to learn:

Teachers in Finland spend fewer hours at school each day and spend less time in classrooms than American teachers. Teachers use the extra time to build curriculums and assess their students. Children spend far more time playing outside, even in the depths of winter. Homework is minimal. Compulsory schooling does not begin until age 7. “We have no hurry,” said Louhivuori. “Children learn better when they are ready. Why stress them out?”

And, the teachers are highly respected as well — to say nothing of very highly trained at Government expense:

Practically speaking-and Finns are nothing if not practical-the decision meant that goal would not be allowed to dissipate into rhetoric. Lawmakers landed on a deceptively simple plan that formed the foundation for everything to come. Public schools would be organized into one system of comprehensive schools, or peruskoulu, for ages 7 through 16. Teachers from all over the nation contributed to a national curriculum that provided guidelines, not prescriptions. Besides Finnish and Swedish (the country’s second official language), children would learn a third language (English is a favourite) usually beginning at age 9. Resources were distributed equally. As the comprehensive schools improved, so did the upper secondary schools (grades 10 through 12). The second critical decision came in 1979 when reformers required that every teacher earn a fifth-year master’s degree in theory and practice at one of eight state universities-at state expense. From then on, teachers were effectively granted equal status with doctors and lawyers.

Essentially, you stop treating teachers like they are idiots, they develop pride in their work and make it their mission to help children learn — instead of just putting on a tolerable performance so they keep their jobs:

Applicants began flooding teaching programs, not because the salaries were so high but because autonomy and respect made the job attractive. In 2010, some 6,600 applicants vied for 660 primary school training slots, according to Sahlberg. By the mid-1980s, a final set of initiatives shook the classrooms free from the last vestiges of top-down regulation. Control over policies shifted to town councils. The national curriculum was distilled into broad guidelines. National math goals for grades one through nine, for example, were reduced to a neat ten pages. Sifting and sorting children into so-called ability groupings was eliminated. All children-clever or less so-were to be taught in the same classrooms, with lots of special teacher help available to make sure no child really would be left behind. The inspectorate closed its doors in the early ’90s, turning accountability and inspection over to teachers and principals. “We have our own motivation to succeed because we love the work,” said Louhivuori. “Our incentives come from inside.”

So much so that they no longer even need government supervision — they want to excel from the depths of the pride in who they are and the honour they receive from society.

Some of the more vocal conservative reformers in America have grown weary of the “We-Love-Finland crowd” or so-called Finnish Envy. They argue that the United States has little to learn from a country of only 5.4 million people-4 percent of them foreign-born. Yet the Finns seem to be onto something. Neighboring Norway, a country of similar size, embraces education policies similar to those in the United States. It employs standardized exams and teachers without master’s degrees. And like America, Norway’s PISA scores have been stalled in the middle ranges for the better part of a decade.

Oh, and it’s not just some European thing where that people group somehow does better either. Though, it just may have something to do with a national policy of treating everyone fairly decently:

It’s almost unheard of for a child to show up hungry or homeless. Finland provides three years of maternity leave and subsidized daycare to parents, and preschool for all 5-year-olds, where the emphasis is on the play and socializing. In addition, the state subsidizes parents, paying them around 150 euros per month for every child until he or she turns 17. Ninety-seven percent of 6-year-olds attend public preschool, where children begin some academics. Schools provide food, medical care, counselling and taxi service if needed. Stu ≠dent health care is free.

And the moral of the story is: Take care of people, treat them with respect and give them the tools to do their jobs and they will take pride in their work and give you one of the best education systems in the world. Don’t be a dick to children, make sure they get to spend lots of time being mothered, feed them, make sure they are healthy and unstressed and they will learn better than most of the world.

Whodathunkit???

Well, certainly not our brilliant and fearless leader — who is busy exporting both our worst educational failures and the associated testing systems to the rest of the world…

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